Violent Passions: Managing Love in the Old French Verse by Tracy Adams (auth.)

By Tracy Adams (auth.)

This e-book re-evaluates the notion of "courtly love" in previous French verse. Adams lines how those verses discover the emotional trials of amour and suggest coping tools for the lovelorn.

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By Tracy Adams (auth.)

This e-book re-evaluates the notion of "courtly love" in previous French verse. Adams lines how those verses discover the emotional trials of amour and suggest coping tools for the lovelorn.

Show description

Read Online or Download Violent Passions: Managing Love in the Old French Verse Romance PDF

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Extra info for Violent Passions: Managing Love in the Old French Verse Romance

Sample text

66 Not that sexual intercourse was by its nature evil. 67 But since the Fall, lust, by definition uncontrollable, is inevitably present during sex, and therefore the act is tainted. Sexual love, then, was generally considered to be highly problematic because it necessarily unleashed desire. Even those who accepted that sex performed for the purpose of procreation was guilt free despite the unfortunate but necessary presence of lust believed that sexual relations motivated by lust alone were sinful.

One evil, above all others (unum malum super omnia mala malum), has lacerated and afflicted his spirit throughout his life, an evil he calls “desiderium voluptatis, delectatio carnis, tempestas libidinis” (sexual desire, carnal delight, the storm of lust). Est et praeter haec, unum malum super omnia mala malum, quo tanto gravius et miserabilius lacertum et afflictum animum meum sentio, quanto et ab ipsis cunabulis semper mecum fuit, mecum crevit, in infantia, in adolescentia, in juventute mihi semper adhaesit, nec adhuc jam prae senectute membris deficientibus me deserit.

But the first story of love and mutation of the Metamorphoses reveals that love’s power to torment exceeds even the self-control of the gods. Apollo, “sapiens ratione,” who divided the light from the dark, is not exempt from the dreadful force! 18 How is it that the very epitome of reason is incapable of defending himself from the arrows of love, or in the words of the Neoplatonic cosmology, of patterning his inclinations after the movement of the heavens? Despite his apparent belief in human ratio, Arnulf seems to remove love from the affects that can be regulated, assigning it a power beyond all capacity to control.

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