Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War by Susan Southard

By Susan Southard

A robust and unflinching account of the long-lasting influence of nuclear warfare, instructed in the course of the tales of these who survived

On August nine, 1945, 3 days after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the us dropped a moment atomic bomb on Nagasaki, a small port urban on Japan's southernmost island. An expected 74,000 humans died in the first 5 months, and one other 75,000 have been injured.
Published at the 70th anniversary of the bombing, Nagasaki takes readers from the morning of the bombing to town this present day, telling the first-hand stories of 5 survivors, all of whom have been childrens on the time of the devastation. Susan
Southard has spent years interviewing hibakusha ("bomb-affected people") and discovering the actual, emotional, and social demanding situations of post-atomic lifestyles. She weaves jointly dramatic eyewitness bills with searing research of the rules of censorship and denial that coloured a lot of what was once suggested concerning the bombing either within the usa and Japan.

A gripping narrative of human resilience, Nagasaki may help form public dialogue and debate over the most arguable wartime acts in background.

Show description

By Susan Southard

A robust and unflinching account of the long-lasting influence of nuclear warfare, instructed in the course of the tales of these who survived

On August nine, 1945, 3 days after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, the us dropped a moment atomic bomb on Nagasaki, a small port urban on Japan's southernmost island. An expected 74,000 humans died in the first 5 months, and one other 75,000 have been injured.
Published at the 70th anniversary of the bombing, Nagasaki takes readers from the morning of the bombing to town this present day, telling the first-hand stories of 5 survivors, all of whom have been childrens on the time of the devastation. Susan
Southard has spent years interviewing hibakusha ("bomb-affected people") and discovering the actual, emotional, and social demanding situations of post-atomic lifestyles. She weaves jointly dramatic eyewitness bills with searing research of the rules of censorship and denial that coloured a lot of what was once suggested concerning the bombing either within the usa and Japan.

A gripping narrative of human resilience, Nagasaki may help form public dialogue and debate over the most arguable wartime acts in background.

Show description

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Additional info for Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War

Sample text

It is about a community, its politicians, and its businesses, including media companies, initially seeking short-term economic gain, failing to ask questions, and now facing long-term environmental and health risks. The saga of Rocky Flats and the end of the Cold War provide a rare opportunity to examine why the citizens of the world's greatest democracy Page 4 willingly participated in building huge nuclear arsenals capable of destroying the human species. The legacy of that nuclear arms race remains with us.

The army didn't ignore senators with influence over military budgets. Such constituent caretaking typified Johnson, a likable fellow who instinctively lived by the rules of politicking. He seldom saw a hand he didn't shake and had a reputation for personally answering more letters than any other senator in Washington. Known universally as Big Ed or the Big Swede, Johnson was a six-foot, two-inch, two hundred-pounder who sported a crew cut and always retained a slightly innocent, farm boy look. 1 Raised on a Nebraska ranch, Johnson dreamed of becoming a railroad president.

Although Frank and Katherine retained just 104 acres of the home place ranch, they held on to about 4,000 acres on Rocky Flats. The family's mountain properties remained intact. Marcus saw a lot of his father during the early 1930s, when Frank spent extended periods in the mountains. The two men decided head lettuce would thrive in the cool mountain summers of Middle Park. They hired Japanese workers to clear the sagebrush for a lettuce field and built a packing shed in the town of Granby so the produce could be shipped by railroad to Denver and other markets.

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